Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The following examples treat creating a new action called “swearing at,” which is drawn from the Inform manual. In addition, there are examples of the Before and Instead of rules. Sometimes the story creator will want to do a couple of things:

  1. Anticipate what a player/reader might do in a given circumstance (swear at something)
  2. Anticipate other options for the reader/player to interact with the world (assuring that one action is done prior to another).
The Foyer is a room. The description of the Foyer is "A small space meant for greeting the house."

A fork and a knife and a steak are in the Foyer. The steak is edible. A scarf is in the Foyer. The description of the scarf is "It's a woolen piece of clothing, knitted by your grandmother many years ago." The scarf is wearable.

A lizard is in the Foyer. The description of the lizard is "It's an amazing little creature." The lizard can be hot or cold. The lizard is hot.

Understand "dirty little thing", "little crocodile", and "creature" as lizard. 

A dog is in the Foyer. Understand "mutt" as dog.

A big red car is in the Foyer. Understand "car" as big red car.

Swearing at is an action applying to one thing. Understand "swear at [something]" and "cuss at [something]" as swearing at.

Before eating the steak:
 if the knife is carried by the player, continue the action;
 otherwise say "You can't eat a steak with your fingers, pig." instead.

The Garage is south of the Foyer. A closed openable box is in the Garage. 

Instead of opening the box, say "You open the box and inside the box you see a hole to the center of the earth. Maybe it's a portal to another dimension."

Before going south from the Foyer:
 if the scarf is worn, continue the action;
 otherwise say "Do you really want to go outside without your scarf?" instead.

Instead of examining the lizard for the second time, say "A crazy looking thing that."

Instead of taking the lizard:
 if the lizard is cold, continue the action;
 otherwise say "You can't take the lizard." instead.

Instead of swearing at the steak, say "You goddamned steak. I hate you."

the same info as above but in an easier form to read but without proper spacing

“On Rules 2” by Stephen Ersinghaus

The Foyer is a room. The description of the Foyer is “A small space meant for greeting the house.”

A fork and a knife and a steak are in the Foyer. The steak is edible. A scarf is in the Foyer. The description of the scarf is “It’s a woolen piece of clothing, knitted by your grandmother many years ago.” The scarf is wearable.

A lizard is in the Foyer. The description of the lizard is “It’s an amazing little creature.” The lizard can be hot or cold. The lizard is hot.

Understand “dirty little thing”, “little crocodile”, and “creature” as lizard.

A dog is in the Foyer. Understand “mutt” as dog.

A big red car is in the Foyer. Understand “car” as big red car.

Swearing at is an action applying to one thing. Understand “swear at [something]” and “cuss at [something]” as swearing at.

Before eating the steak:
if the knife is carried by the player, continue the action;
otherwise say “You can’t eat a steak with your fingers, pig.” instead.

The Garage is south of the Foyer. A closed openable box is in the Garage.

Instead of opening the box, say “You open the box and inside the box you see a hole to the center of the earth. Maybe it’s a portal to another dimension.”

Before going south from the Foyer:
if the scarf is worn, continue the action;
otherwise say “Do you really want to go outside without your scarf?” instead.

Instead of examining the lizard for the second time, say “A crazy looking thing that.”

Instead of taking the lizard:
if the lizard is cold, continue the action;
otherwise say “You can’t take the lizard.” instead.

Instead of swearing at the steak, say “You goddamned steak. I hate you.”